Girl-mode vs. Boy-mode: Ending The War

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10 Responses

  1. This is so well written. I am very impressed. I don’t agree with all of your views. That’s okay. I would love for the world to read your blog, maybe then people would be a little more understanding.

    • Jo says:

      There is no need to agree with all the views. In fact, I prefer that people don’t. If we all agreed no discussion, no interaction would be meaningful because learning and engagement comes from civil disagreement. All I can write is what is of my perspective 🙂

      Thank you for the compliments. I wish people would be more understanding, I’m very honored that you think what I have to say would make people more understanding.

  2. My dear granddaughter, Jo:
    WOW! WOW! WOW! I can only stand in awe at the way you use words! And I thought I could write. Not even close! First, I so agree with you on the “sticks and stones…” bit. Yes, words DO hurt and I’m still carrying the hurt from some, especially when I was very overweight. Another phrase that I don’t like is “Forgive and forget”. While I have been able to forgive I still remember.”
    Finally, I am learning so much about this whole process and understanding some things so much better because you are brave enough to bare your soul and put it on here for everyone to read. THANK YOU!
    I love you so much. Cher had this to say when someone asked her about Chasity becoming Chas: “Still my child, just in a different package”. You are always my grandchild…just transitioning into a different and even more beautiful package!
    Love,
    Grandma Browning

  3. My dear granddaughter, Jo:
    WOW! WOW! WOW! I can only stand in awe at the way you use words! And I thought I could write. Not even close! First, I so agree with you on the “sticks and stones…” bit. Yes, words DO hurt and I’m still carrying the hurt from some, especially when I was very overweight. Another phrase that I don’t like is “Forgive and forget”. While I have been able to forgive I still remember.”
    Finally, I am learning so much about this whole process and understanding some things so much better because you are brave enough to bare your soul and put it on here for everyone to read. THANK YOU!
    I love you so much. Cher had this to say when someone asked her about Chasity becoming Chas: “Still my child, just in a different package”. You are always my grandchild…just transitioning into a different and even more beautiful package!
    Love,
    Grandma Browning

  4. Marcy says:

    I am privileged to know you…I admire your strength, beauty, courage, talents and soul. I look forward to what you are going to continue to do in this life and watching you bloom. Thank you for letting me witness this transition and learn about myself from it.

  5. Marcy says:

    One more thing. The song is perfect for you!

  6. Susie Hayes says:

    You are a brilliant writer. My daughter is 14, and came out to us as transgender when she was 13. I feel like reading your blog is giving me a window into what might be happening inside her her head (even though everyone’s head is different). She still hasn’t socially transitioned – so goes to school in “boy mode” every day. Your writing is inspirational, and your bit on bullying was spot on. I am definitely going to share your blog with my daughter.

  7. I suspect this is very much how my 11 year old feels. He is still wrestling with trying to figure things out, but he’s got the freedom to express this to us, so I hope that his struggle is a little easier to bear and that he is able to sort things out a bit sooner. I will save this post to share with him. Thank you for your words – you are a very clear & eloquent writer!

    • Jo says:

      Thank you for the compliments! I wish your young one the best!

      Really the only thing you can do is provide an open door to a loving home. They will have to step though it. For some it’s very quick. I recently met a couple children younger than ten that were already accepting themselves as transgender even though they couldn’t say the word. For some it takes a long time, for me it was 29 for some they can’t come out until they are 50+. He’ll appreciate everything you do, even if he can’t express that.

  8. I suspect this is very much how my 11 year old feels. He is still wrestling with trying to figure things out, but he’s got the freedom to express this to us, so I hope that his struggle is a little easier to bear and that he is able to sort things out a bit sooner. I will save this post to share with him. Thank you for your words – you are a very clear & eloquent writer!

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